ucr botanical gardens

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Ucr Botanical Gardens

Though the traditional date of founding for the Botanic Gardens is considered to be 1963, the "seed" for a botanical garden at U. C. Riverside was actually planted in 1954. Then, Botany Professor Victor Goodman from Missouri found himself unfamiliar with western plants and without a local botanical garden to learn from and use in teaching. Dr. Frank Vasek joined the University in 1954 and was appointed to spearhead the quest for a garden. In 1962, funds were finally allocated to begin the development of what was then called the "Life Sciences Experimental Area". In 1957, after some controversy, 37 acres of land were selected and set aside for the project. Dr. Vasek became the first Director in 1962, oversaw the first plantings in 1963, and continued as Director until 1967. Dennis Kucera was hired as the first Gardens Manager in late 1962 to begin the actual development and maintenance of the new garden. From 1967 to 1973, Dr. George Gillett headed the garden as Mr. Kucera continued its physical development. It was at the beginning of Dr. Gillett's direction that the "Life Sciences Experimental Area" became the UCR Botanic Gardens. Also at this time, one more employee, Mr. Norman Sheppeard, was added, bringing the staff to two to install and maintain the plantings. A number of important improvements were made to the Gardens during Dr. Gillette's charge, including asphalting the main drive and constructing several bridges, the pond, and the office and garage. 1973 to 1981 brought the leadership of Dr. Louis Erickson. Dr. Erickson encouraged and developed community involvement in the Gardens by installing display and specialty plantings. He began to keep the Gardens open on weekends, two Sundays a month. It was due to his inspiration and influence, that community members John Babbage, Frank Hagen and Grant Carner became interested in starting a "friends" support group. The Friends of UCRBG was established in 1980 and has been a crucial aid to the continued development of the Gardens ever since. It was also through Dr. Erickson's influence that the entrance Gatehouse and restrooms, the Conference Room and the greenhouse were funded and constructed. Dr. Giles Waines took the helm in 1981 and remained Director through 2016. Dr. Erickson continues as an active advisor and volunteer.
ucr botanical gardens 1

Ucr Botanical Gardens

Though the traditional date of founding for the Botanic Gardens is considered to be 1963, the "seed" for a botanical garden at U. C. Riverside was actually planted in 1954. Then, Botany Professor Victor Goodman from Missouri found himself unfamiliar with western plants and without a local botanical garden to learn from and use in teaching. Dr. Frank Vasek joined the University in 1954 and was appointed to spearhead the quest for a garden. In 1962, funds were finally allocated to begin the development of what was then called the "Life Sciences Experimental Area". In 1957, after some controversy, 37 acres of land were selected and set aside for the project. Dr. Vasek became the first Director in 1962, oversaw the first plantings in 1963, and continued as Director until 1967. Dennis Kucera was hired as the first Gardens Manager in late 1962 to begin the actual development and maintenance of the new garden. From 1967 to 1973, Dr. George Gillett headed the garden as Mr. Kucera continued its physical development. It was at the beginning of Dr. Gillett's direction that the "Life Sciences Experimental Area" became the UCR Botanic Gardens. Also at this time, one more employee, Mr. Norman Sheppeard, was added, bringing the staff to two to install and maintain the plantings. A number of important improvements were made to the Gardens during Dr. Gillette's charge, including asphalting the main drive and constructing several bridges, the pond, and the office and garage. 1973 to 1981 brought the leadership of Dr. Louis Erickson. Dr. Erickson encouraged and developed community involvement in the Gardens by installing display and specialty plantings. He began to keep the Gardens open on weekends, two Sundays a month. It was due to his inspiration and influence, that community members John Babbage, Frank Hagen and Grant Carner became interested in starting a "friends" support group. The Friends of UCRBG was established in 1980 and has been a crucial aid to the continued development of the Gardens ever since. It was also through Dr. Erickson's influence that the entrance Gatehouse and restrooms, the Conference Room and the greenhouse were funded and constructed. Dr. Giles Waines took the helm in 1981 and remained Director through 2016. Dr. Erickson continues as an active advisor and volunteer. Detailed History: Inception to 1993
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Ucr Botanical Gardens

The UCR Botanic Gardens are actually composed of two parts: the overall UCR campus and the 40-acre (160,000 m2) botanical gardens. The landscaped area around the buildings on campus demonstrates a wide variety of plants adapted to the arid inland area of Southern California. The Gardens were established primarily for teaching purposes and serve to provide plant materials for courses such as anthropology, art, biology, ecology, entomology, morphology, ornamental horticulture, plant pathology, photography, and taxonomy. The Gardens also provide plant materials for research and for exhibiting species from all parts of the world.
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Ucr Botanical Gardens

Twice a year, the Gardens brings you the largest plant sale event in the Inland Empire. In spring, usually the first full weekend in April, comes the UCRBG Spring Plant Sale. In fall, usually the third weekend in October, it's the Friends of UCRBG Fall Plant Sale. A typical sale finds nearly 10,000 plants and more than 400 kinds available. All types of plants are to be had, from a huge array of cacti and rare succulents to hard-to-find water and waterside plants and unusual patio and houseplants to colorful landscape trees. The emphasis is on water efficient plants from around the world, but a variety of shade and water tolerant selections are always available. A fine range of choice California native plants are available at both sales, though more are sold for the fall planting season. Only varieties that can be planted at the time of the sale are sold. Miniature roses, hundreds of herbs, orchids and wildlflower seeds round out the choices. To aid in your selection, the plants are grouped by general plant type: trees, shrubs, vines, herbaceous plants, shade plants, house/patio plants, cactus/succulents, water plants, etc. Each variety of plant has an information sign that includes size, water needs, sun preferences, flower time and color, Sunset Western Garden Book Climate Zone, etc., and a color photograph. Expert Gardens staff, Volunteers and U.C. Master Gardeners are available to answer questions. There is a Preview Plant Sale for Members of the Friends of UCR Botanic Gardens. For more information on the sale, or on joining the "Friends", contact us at ucrbg@ucr.edu Spring Plant Sale, April 1st and 2nd, 2017 Fall Plant Sale, October 22nd and 23rd, 2016
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Ucr Botanical Gardens

Come enjoy the relaxing atmosphere of the UCR Botanic Gardens! Nestled in the foothills of the Box Springs Mountains on the east side of the University of California, Riverside Campus, the Gardens covers 40 hilly acres. Wander over four miles of scenic trails or just relax on a bench and enjoy the beauty.
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Ucr Botanical Gardens

“We want to expand our outreach to the campus community; to the broader community through communication and events and activities; and develop a more detailed map of the place so visitors can be directed to various parts and become educated about what they are seeing,” said Holt, who retired from teaching botany and plant sciences last year and will oversee the gardens for the next three years. “Visitors love the rustic and wild nature of the gardens, but they tend to visit only one part and miss out on seeing the rest. We want them connected to all parts of the gardens.”
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Ucr Botanical Gardens

The gardens include horticultural sites and botanical collections. During the past several decades, the facility’s base of friends, members, volunteers and donors has grown to the point where new projects are possible, Holt said. “I want to make sure we’re building on something great that Giles built before me. We have the capacity to do a lot more, and we want visitors to enjoy, use and appreciate this place.”
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Ucr Botanical Gardens

The gardens are home to 195 bird species, ranging from kites, mallards, falcons and kestrels to quail, plovers, swallows, starlings and woodpeckers. Mammalian residents include California ground squirrels, Audubon cottontails, kangaroo rats, gophers, coyotes, gray foxes, opossums, pack rats, skunks and bobcats. Reptiles, including turtles, lizards of many kinds, and snakes, ranging from gopher snakes to the venomous rattlers, also populate the gardens. Amphibian residents include bullfrogs, western toads, salamanders and Pacific Tree Frog. Fishes include koi and carp.
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Toward that goal, she’s hired three full-time employees, has arranged for free parking for volunteers, and, with the help of a student, is connecting the gardens and community through social media. Two new gardens — a year-round color one and an ethnobotany version involving plants used by indigenous peoples — are in the works.
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“There’s a rustic wildness to it that many urban and manicured gardens have lost,” Holt said. “When you come here, you feel like you’re lost in the woods. Or, in our rose or herb gardens you can find ideas about things you might want to plant in your yard.”

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