san francisco botanical garden

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San Francisco Botanical Garden

Plans for the garden were originally laid out in the 1880s by park supervisor John McLaren, but funding was insufficient to begin construction until Helene Strybing left a major bequest in 1927. Planting was begun in 1937 with WPA funds supplemented by local donations, and the arboretum officially opened in May 1940. As a part of Golden Gate Park, it is officially managed by the city of San Francisco, but the San Francisco Botanical Garden Society plays an important role in providing educational programs, managing volunteers, and curatorial staff. Formed in 1955, the San Francisco Botanical Garden Society (formerly the Strybing Arboretum Society) operates the Helen Crocker Russell Library of Horticulture, a bookstore, and monthly plant sales, and offers a wide range of community education programs for children and adults. The Society also raises money for new projects and Garden renovations. Using green building practices, a new Center for Sustainable Gardening is planned to replace the existing nursery. Other planned renovations include a Southeast Asian Cloud Forest and newly paved pathways.
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San Francisco Botanical Garden

A carnival of colors, scents, and vibrant visions decorate the space of the San Francisco Botanical Garden (also the formerly known Strybing Arboretum). As part of the memorable Golden Gate Park, 55 acres of land stretch across San Francisco, laying out the foundation for a symphony of plants, flowers, and trees to share the roaring sound of nature with the public. A visit to this magical display of greenery consists of more than 7,500 varieties of flora from across the globe. As a result, the San Francisco Botanical Garden is the largest of its kind on the West Coast.
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San Francisco Botanical Garden

Today, although the city of San Francisco is the official management behind this popular Golden Gate Park sight, the San Francisco Botanical Garden Society (formerly known as the Strybing Arboretum Society) has quite an influence over the maintenance of the collected specimens. With a history tracing back to 1955, the Society is also in charge of the Helen Crocker Russell Library of Horticulture, a bookstore, monthly plant deals, and the offering of numerous community education projects. To this day, the San Francisco Botanical Garden still obtains additional plants to add to their ever-growing assortment of foliage.
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Bean Sprouts Family Days Start a new tradition with family and friends and get outside to play at the Garden! Bean Sprouts Family Days presented by Kaiser Permanente invites families with children of all ages to enjoy nature crafts, garden care, outdoor games and exploration in the Children's Garden with help from Garden staff and interns. 1–4pm, Every Saturday, April–October. FREE with regular admission. Garden Feast Our natural world is threatened, and at the same time, we are losing our connection to it. San Francisco Botanical Garden has set a goal to reach every child in our region with hands-on outdoor programs that connect children to nature. Join us for this year's Garden Feast luncheon to help spark a love of our planet in the next generation. Flower Piano Please join us July 13-24 as the Garden, in collaboration with Sunset Piano, once again, becomes the city’s own outdoor concert hall, where everyone is invited to play or listen, enjoying the powerful relationship of music, community, and nature.
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The Botanical Garden is also home to the Helen Crocker Russell Library of Horticulture, with 27,000 books and 450 periodicals covering all aspects of horticulture, from garden design and pest management to ethnobotany, botanical art, and children’s botanical books. Established in 1972, it is the largest such collection in northern California. The library hosts exhibits of botanical art and offers free children’s story times and family walks.
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Welcome to San Francisco Botanical Garden, one of the most diverse gardens in the world. Escape to a unique, 55-acre urban oasis of extraordinary beauty. The Botanical Garden is a living museum within Golden Gate Park, offering 55 acres of both landscaped gardens and open spaces, showcasing over 8,500 different kinds of plants from around the world.
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Most of the Garden's pathways are wheelchair accessible, and accessible pathways are marked on wayfinding signage with the ISA symbol. Complimentary wheelchairs are available at either Garden entrance on a first come, first served basis. Accessible restrooms are located near the Friend Gate, at the North entrance to the Botanical Garden at Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and Tea Garden Drive. There are also restrooms inside the Library building adjacent to the main entrance, and in the Great Meadow. These restrooms are not accessible. This link will take you to a printable map showing the location of the accessible restroom and accessible paths of travel. Click this link for more information on San Francisco Recreation and Parks accessibility, including requesting accommodations.
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The San Francisco Botanical Garden at Strybing Arboretum grows and conserves plants from around the world — more than 8,000 varieties in 55 acres of landscaped gardens and open spaces. Stroll through a grove of coast redwoods and a Mediterranean garden, explore cloud forests from meso-America and southeast Asia, and wander gardens of flora from Chile, Australia, Japan, California, and more. The garden’s special collections include rhododendrons, camellias, magnolias, and succulents. The Garden of Fragrance, designed in 1965 to allow people with visual impairments to enjoy plants through touch and smell, features aromatic plants in beds made of stones from a 12th-century Spanish monastery brought to the United States by newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst.
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Garden Feast Our natural world is threatened, and at the same time, we are losing our connection to it. San Francisco Botanical Garden has set a goal to reach every child in our region with hands-on outdoor programs that connect children to nature. Join us for this year's Garden Feast luncheon to help spark a love of our planet in the next generation.
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On warm days you will often see picnickers and loungers spread out on the Great Meadow. Children in particular love the waterfowl pond, where you’ll see egrets, ducks, and many other birds, and the moon-viewing garden, with its deck overlooking a turtle-shaped island. The Botanical Garden offers lectures, tours, and classes on subjects ranging from gardening to botanical illustration and photography, and its Youth Education Program serves over 10,000 schoolchildren every year through guided walks, storytime walks, a treasure hunt, and the hands-on Children’s Garden.
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Our natural world is threatened, and at the same time, we are losing our connection to it. San Francisco Botanical Garden has set a goal to reach every child in our region with hands-on outdoor programs that connect children to nature. Join us for this year's Garden Feast luncheon to help spark a love of our planet in the next generation.
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The San Francisco Botanical Garden is one of the most diverse gardens in the world. A unique urban oasis, the garden is a living museum within Golden Gate Park, offering 55 acres of both landscaped gardens and open spaces, and showcasing over 8,000 different kinds of plants from around the world.
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The makings of the San Francisco Botanical Garden first began during the 1890s through the vision of park supervisor, John McLaren. Since money wore thin at that time for the construction of such an attraction, the actual assembly of the dream did not begin until 1926. Through the generosity of Helene Strybing, the funds were made available for the garden to take shape and flourish. By 1937, planting of the grounds took place after a supply of local donations was acquired. Three years later, the arboretum was fit for visitation, and opened to the public in May of 1940.
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d) Buy a Plant: For those looking to spice up their garden, the San Francisco Botanical Garden provides the perfect opportunity to bring home plants that rarely grace the selection offered at commercial nurseries and gardening locations. The Saturday Plant Sales have become quite the tradition, taking place from 10am to 1pm at the nursery, which is situated at the southwest corner of the Gardens.
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a) Visit the Garden Bookstore: Bring a souvenir back home with you as you purchase calendars, notecards, and posters. A variety of book titles also wait, including subjects on organic gardening, medicinal plants, botanical art, and garden design.
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William Hammond Hall’s original plan for Golden Gate Park included a botanical garden, and in 1890 the park’s superintendent, John McLaren, identified the current site as appropriate and began planting trees. But funds to develop the garden did not become available until Helene Strybing left a bequest to the city in 1926. Construction began in 1937, and the arboretum opened to the public in 1940.
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Start a new tradition with family and friends and get outside to play at the Garden! Bean Sprouts Family Days presented by Kaiser Permanente invites families with children of all ages to enjoy nature crafts, garden care, outdoor games and exploration in the Children's Garden with help from Garden staff and interns. 1–4pm, Every Saturday, April–October. FREE with regular admission.
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If you wish to enjoy the beauty of the Calfornia out doors, there is no place better than to walk on the level wlakways in Golden Gte Park, and visit the Botanical Garden,.. the walking is free, and the Gardens are beautiful..

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