naples botanical garden

20 views

Naples Botanical Garden

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages) A major contributor to this article appears to have a close connection with its subject. It may require cleanup to comply with Wikipedia's content policies, particularly neutral point of view. Please discuss further on the talk page. (February 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Infinity pool at the Burle Marx Plaza in the Brazilian garden Naples Botanical Garden is a botanical garden in Naples, Florida, United States. Incorporated in 1994, the Garden consists of 170 acres of cultivated gardens and preservation land, representing seven distinct natural habitats and ecosystems, and featuring over 1000 species, with special emphasis on the ecosystems between the 26th parallel north and the 26th parallel south. Nov. 2013 Naples Botanical-1 Nov 2013 Naples Botanical Gardens-1 The gardens are located at 4820 Bayshore Drive, Naples, FL 34112. The Garden was founded in 1993. In 2000, the late Harvey Kapnick, Jr. donated $5 million for the purchase of 170 acres of open space 3 miles from downtown Naples. In 2006 the master plan for Naples Botanical Garden was completed with the contemplated gardens representing the culture and flora of the tropics. Construction on the first phase began in 2008 with the digging of Deep Lake and Lake Tupke and the sculpting of the site with 250,000 yards of fill produced by lake excavation. In November 2009 the Garden opened the Smith Children’s Garden, Kapnick Brazilian Garden, Kapnick Caribbean Garden and the Smith River of Grass. In January 2010, The Florida Gulf Coast University Harvey Kapnick Research and Education Center, a shared use facility, opened. Later in 2010 the Garden opened the Scott Florida Garden, Buehler Enabling Garden, Garden Club of Naples Idea Garden, Lea Asian Garden and the Water Garden. In October 2014 the master plan implementation was completed with the opening of the Chabraja Visitor Center including Kathryn’s Garden, Irma’s Garden, LaGrippe Orchid Garden, Kapnick Hall, Berger Shop in the Garden and the Fogg Café. See also List of botanical gardens and arboretums in Florida References External links Naples Botanical Garden Coordinates: 26°09′11″N 81°47′55″W / 26.15306°N 81.79861°W / 26.15306; -81.79861 This article about a location in Collier County, Florida is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e This article related to a garden in the United States is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e
naples botanical garden 1

Naples Botanical Garden

As a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation serving our community is why we exist. Naples Botanical Garden is a treasure-trove of flora (and occasional fauna!) in the heart of Naples, enriching our community not only with natural resources, but with largescale exhibitions, concerts, flower shows, holiday celebrations and family friendly events. Significant fundraising opportunities such as Hats in the Garden, the kick off to Naples’ social season, help fund education and horticulture programs throughout the year.
naples botanical garden 2

Naples Botanical Garden

As a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation serving our community is why we exist. Naples Botanical Garden is a treasure-trove of flora (and occasional fauna!) in the heart of Naples, enriching our community not only with natural resources, but with largescale exhibitions, concerts, flower shows, holiday celebrations and family friendly events. Significant fundraising opportunities such as Hats in the Garden, the kick off to Naples’ social season, help fund education and horticulture programs throughout the year. Thank you for your support!
naples botanical garden 3

The opening of the Eleanor and Nicholas Chabraja Visitor Center in October 2014 represented the final phase in the Garden’s first master plan. Designed to and awarded LEED Gold standard, this $16 million project tied together the first two phases opened in 2009 and 2010 to create an integrated visitor experience with exceptional amenities. The response from our guests has been outstanding; TripAdvisor ranks Naples Botanical Garden as the #1 attraction in Naples with over 95% of visitors rating their experience very good or excellent. Charity Navigator reported that we were the 7th fastest growing not for profit in the United States in 2013 and they have also awarded the Garden 4 stars, the highest possible for financial management.
naples botanical garden 4

Brownea hybridaKathryn's Garden Brownea hybrida Brownea is from the Fabaceae family, like the Jade Vine! This family includes plants commonly found in your grocery store such as peas and beans (but please don't eat the Brownea). This tree is native to the tropical rainforests of South America; and is in good company in Kathryn's Garden, which was inspired by the paintings of Henri Rousseau (1844-1910). Fried Egg TreeLea Asian Garden Oncoba Spinosa Named for the blooms similar appearance to a favorite breakfast food item; the Fried Egg Tree is a native of South Africa, although it has a wide reach across the continent and flourishes in tropical areas. Queen’s WreathKapnick Caribbean Garden Petrea volubilis Queen's Wreath, also referred to as Sandpaper Vine for its rough evergreen leaves, is a highlight of the Kapnick Caribbean Garden. Often mistaken for Wisteria, the genus name Petrea is for Lord Robert Petre, an 18th century exotic botany enthusiast. Volubilis refers to the twining of the branches that enable the vine to climb so profusely. Rooster’s CrestKapnick Brazilian Garden Camptosema grandiflora Rooster's crest is blooming near the Burle Marx mural in the Kapnick Brazilian Garden. This Brazilian native is sometimes confused with red jade vine (Mucuna bennettii), which it does closely resemble; in fact, rooster's crest is also sometimes known as miniature red jade vine. Both plants are high-climbing members of the pea family (Fabaceae), although M. bennettii has more tropical origins and is not as cold-hardy as the plant pictured here. Rooster's crest is attractive to both butterflies and hummingbirds and typically blooms through early winter. Flame of the ForestNorth Grove Butea monosperma Flame of the forest is just starting to bloom in the North Grove. Until the flowers start to open, it is easy to overlook this tree as its flower buds are nearly black and it sheds its leaves before blooming. Once it does start flowering, though, it really is the "flame of the forest" and difficult to miss! Look for this large tree as you head west from the Water Garden
naples botanical garden 5

joethewranglerBoston, Massachusetts348Reviewed 5 days ago via mobile A great assetAn interesting, beautiful park. Regional flora are displayed. It is a relaxing, lovely experience. The little restaurant is perfect for a light lunch. We stay in Naples for a few months, so take out a membership which makes multiple visits a good deal.Thank joethewrangler
naples botanical garden 6

Reviewed 5 days ago via mobile A great assetAn interesting, beautiful park. Regional flora are displayed. It is a relaxing, lovely experience. The little restaurant is perfect for a light lunch. We stay in Naples for a few months, so take out a membership which makes multiple visits a good deal.Thank joethewrangler
naples botanical garden 7

An interesting, beautiful park. Regional flora are displayed. It is a relaxing, lovely experience. The little restaurant is perfect for a light lunch. We stay in Naples for a few months, so take out a membership which makes multiple visits a good deal.
naples botanical garden 8

Brownea hybridaKathryn's Garden Brownea hybrida Brownea is from the Fabaceae family, like the Jade Vine! This family includes plants commonly found in your grocery store such as peas and beans (but please don't eat the Brownea). This tree is native to the tropical rainforests of South America; and is in good company in Kathryn's Garden, which was inspired by the paintings of Henri Rousseau (1844-1910).
naples botanical garden 9

Queen’s WreathKapnick Caribbean Garden Petrea volubilis Queen's Wreath, also referred to as Sandpaper Vine for its rough evergreen leaves, is a highlight of the Kapnick Caribbean Garden. Often mistaken for Wisteria, the genus name Petrea is for Lord Robert Petre, an 18th century exotic botany enthusiast. Volubilis refers to the twining of the branches that enable the vine to climb so profusely.
naples botanical garden 10

Rooster’s CrestKapnick Brazilian Garden Camptosema grandiflora Rooster's crest is blooming near the Burle Marx mural in the Kapnick Brazilian Garden. This Brazilian native is sometimes confused with red jade vine (Mucuna bennettii), which it does closely resemble; in fact, rooster's crest is also sometimes known as miniature red jade vine. Both plants are high-climbing members of the pea family (Fabaceae), although M. bennettii has more tropical origins and is not as cold-hardy as the plant pictured here. Rooster's crest is attractive to both butterflies and hummingbirds and typically blooms through early winter.
naples botanical garden 11

Queen's Wreath, also referred to as Sandpaper Vine for its rough evergreen leaves, is a highlight of the Kapnick Caribbean Garden. Often mistaken for Wisteria, the genus name Petrea is for Lord Robert Petre, an 18th century exotic botany enthusiast. Volubilis refers to the twining of the branches that enable the vine to climb so profusely.
naples botanical garden 12

For the safety of guests, volunteers and staff, the Garden will close if there is lightning in the area. Please note rainchecks are not provided.

Leave a reply "naples botanical garden"